comic art by Jo Spier

Born in Zutphen, The Netherlands, Joseph Adolf Spier was one of the most popular Dutch illustrators. In the 1930s, he worked for the newspaper De Telegraaf, where he depicted daily life with a mild sense of humor. In 1938, he was chosen as one of the ten most popular Dutch people. During WW II, Spier was arrested for drawing a parody of Hitler, and ended up in camp Westerbork, where he painted a mural in the children's hospital. His family was held in Villa Bouchina, the small privileged camp in Doetinchem, where Spier moved to soon as well. Eventually, the whole family was transported to the Theresienstad concentration camp, which they survived.

Jo Spier

After the war Jo Spier worked for the weekly magazine Elsevier for a while. He also wrote the book 'Dat Alles Heeft Mijn oog Gezien". Because of war trauma, he moved to the USA with his family in 1951. He left his work to the municipal museum of his hometown, Zutphen.

Newspaper clipping on the Dutch mobilization in 1939
Newspaper clipping on the Dutch mobilization in 1939.

About Jo Spier during WWII
(in dutch)

Series en boeken door Jo Spier op voorraad in de Lambiek Webshop:

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