Samir by Bernie

Bernie Aalmeon (in Arabic: عالميون برني) was a French-Jewish cartoonist and comics artist who lived in Egypt in the mid-20th century. During the 1940s he published in Egyptian weeklies like Al Mussawar, Al Ithnain, Al Kawakeb and Al Hilal. He was co-founder of the monthly Egyptian comics weekly Samir (سمير), which was launched in April 1956 by the government-owned publishing company Dar Al-Hilal in Caïro. Inspired by Belgian magazine Tintin which aimed at an audience of "7 to 77 years old", Samir claimed in its tagline to have people from "8 to 88 years old" as a target demographic. The magazine both published translations of European and American comics, as well as Middle-Eastern work by artists like Aalmeon and Haroon (Herant). Aalmeon created the magazine's mascot, Samir, a little Egyptian boy who was featured in gag comics. Unfortunately Aalmeon was forced to leave Egypt later that year, when President Gamal Abdel-Nasser closed the Suez channel which caused an economic crisis in the West. The Suez crisis and the military conflict that happened as a result of it nevertheless had no consequences for Samir. The magazine kept appearing and became one of the most popular Egyptian comics magazines of the 1950s and 1960s, alongside Dunia al-Ahdath. The 'Samir' comics would be continued by other artists, like Ahmed Hijazi.

Samir by Bernie

Series and books by Bernie Aalmeon in stock in the Lambiek Webshop:

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