Emile Brumsteede was a Dutch amateur filmer, known for his experimental short films of the 1950s. He was also active as an advertising designer in Amsterdam, Brussels and The Hague. He was a critic for the magazine Het Vaderland from 1953, and an editor of the monthly magazine Smalfilmen.

Brumsteede was born on East-Java in the Dutch Indies in 1911. He started his filming activities in The Netherlands in 1934, but had to sell his camera to buy food during World War II. He returned to filming after the liberation, and became a member of the Hague Amateur Filmclub in 1947. Brumsteede was especially known for his experimental and inventive way of filming, like applying animation techniques on living persons. He gained notoriety with his 1948 film 'De Sigaret', a film in a continuous loop about a jealous husband who sees a lover of his wife in every object. The artist portrayed himself and his wife in 'Grand ballet des Ballais' (1953), in which a rhythmic montage of the pair doing the annual cleaning gives the illusion of a ballet. Brumsteede was also art director of Carillion-films in Rijswijk. He also wrote a couple of books about filming.

He is furthermore the author of the experimental text comic 'Dannie ben ik', about an anthropomorphic zebra in the town of Zebrastad. It was published in 1961 in the issues 17 through 22 of Olidin, the promotional children's magazine for petrol company Shell, which was produced by the Van Maanen agency in Rotterdam. Other comic artists for this magazine were Friso Henstra, Jan Kruis, Gerard van Straaten, Gerard Wiegel and Jan van der Voo.

Emile Brumsteede passed away in The Hague on 9 November 1962. The Emile Brumsteede Fund was started in 1972 to preserve his artistic legacy.

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